Application Composition | thoughts ?

I made this little composition for my application at the abbey road institute, the age requirements are 18 years or older and i am 16 so i am hoping they accept my application, if you have any tips or thoughts don't be afraid to write them, I am open to any type of help.

Just for any confusion, this video isn't mine, I just used it to show my scoring skills

Cheers.


Comments

  • Hey Ruben,

    you're making me pretty happy, seeing your passion at the perfect age to be full of it...eh..passion that is! And with the right stuff to be called properly talented! šŸ˜ƒšŸ‘ļø

    If Abbey Road needs you to be 18, it's certainly for legal reasons and you should most certainly not be disappointed, if they'll have you wait another 2 years, but I'm pretty sure you've done the right thing to make some "noise" early on, hehe! Good on you, really! More interesting it will be, if you'll be still interested in an internship there, when the time will have come, or whether they'll be asking for you then, looking at your potential trajectory. šŸ¤©

    The big trouble with being young is that there are great many things you simply cannot know, yet, and you don't have to either. But this may end up confusing you at times, like thinking your talent wouldn't be recognized or you wouldn't have enough or the world wasn't ready for you, yet, hahaha, or whatever. Don't ponder the wrong questions! If you feel the love for what you're creating, you are pursuing what you have to and you're on the right track.

    Some thoughts about your showcase there:

    THe LiGHt:

    • very convincing elements, very solid composition with a traditional film score feeling
    • beautiful sounds, too, and good use of most of them
    • some tangible differentiation in places and very decent fit, but...

    thE shADow:

    • not enough variety for a wholesome showcase (instrumentation/arrangement, mood, motives)
    • while a really nice collection of sounds, mix still has issues here and there (watch clipping!)
    • you still have to shake off more of the "me, too" aspects and figure out, who you are and that you can trust yourself way beyond what or who you worry about matching.
    • Percussion, particularly at the end, are a little naive, which sort of makes it endearing, too, but that's part of the arsenal of freedom you still have to discover to go for more refined rhythms and more dynamic use of them.

    Thing about a showcase, if you asked me, was to show more of your scope as a composer, which also includes a certain level of daring. There's great irony, because the educational system seems to ask of you not to fall out of line, to stay firmly within dogma and represent discipline and, really, submission. Like you'd get good grades for doing exactly as you were asked to. But real life for an artist is very different! Unless you dare to let yourself expose your true heart, show your sincere style and use or break norms however you see fit, you won't get recognized. Sure, you still need to communicate in a language that can be understood, but you best don't merely copy what's there already, because, well... it's there already. If you did, it would only allow you to bargain for being the cheaper supplier, but an artist at heart wouldn't want that.

    Anyway, in a showcase you want to find opportunities to show your range, show your prowess in handling different arrangements for various reasons: composition itself, understanding what instruments help support what kind of mood, what instruments go together when and why, how to handle mixing (compression, EQ, potentially effects to support the nature of the sound/moment, etc...), but you don't need to be an expert on any of it. That's the whole point of becoming an apprentice, really. You'd want to show that you wish to learn, but you're already doing your best with what's available to you. Showing care and the knack to understanding is probably the most important thing.

    I think, you have this most excellent desire in what you've shown up there, which makes me very much believe you have a bright future, no matter what. Don't let anyone discourage you, but then again... if you love what you're doing (and I think it shows!!!), nothing and nobody will ever really be able to discourage you at all.

    Thus, hang in there and use the two extra years you may have to wait not by waiting, but by creating! You'll do awesome stuff! šŸ»

  • Thank you so much for the feedback, I truly appreciate your honesty and I will be working on improving those things you said, I have never had any teacher or guidance in the composing world so your advice truly gives me a sense of direction.