How to make your song in midi sound like a live performance?

Hi guys,

I love working with Spitfire Audio, but can´t seem to get the midi information to sound like an actual live recording. Does anybody here have the same? Or had the same and found a way to achieve the ¨live¨ perfomance sound? Would love to learn more! For now I have someone record it on an actual felt piano, but would love to be able to do this anytime and anywhere myself.

Kind Regards,


redouan

Answers

  • I've been using Spitfire Audio libraries since November 2020, and I've ordered a nanoKONTROL2 but I know other people are also ordering MonoGram controllers to individually change parts of their performance. This helps since you can do more with several sliders than you can with one mod wheel.

    The other big difference I've found is having to go back and listen to others play a harp, or a viola, or a cello section, and understand how they should sound. You can also dive into some of the sub-folders (depending on the library/libraries you own and dig more into the individual instruments/recordings). Those can give you some additional nuances on what to add to liven up your recording.

    One other thing is to not let the library do the lifting. This goes back to the listening. When I got my first Albion library (Tundra), I didn't like it. My easiest "to get" library was Albion Solstice, which just had an earthier feel that I could get behind. I still struggle with Tundra but have since added Neo and One libraries in addition to several of the orchestral offerings (e.g., Abbey Road One and BBC Symphony Orchestra Core). The last ones have more individual detail to them whereas the Originals offerings (usually offered less expensively and to which I am addicted) don't give you those finer details to tweak and are meant to play more out of the box as-is.

    In other words, it's not magic, and it takes a lot of work, which I'm still putting into things; however, I'm getting there, and you will as well. I'm sure others have ideas on how to move your recording ball forward. Best of luck!